Latest on Diet Soda

Health Caution: Diet Soda
Did you see the latest news about Diet Soda? I caught it last week on one of the morning shows.

By now, I guess everyone knows that Diet Soda can actually cause you to gain weight, not lose it.

The bigger news is, according to the TV report, that drinking just 1 diet soda per day increases your risk of stroke and dementia.

Don't take my word for it. Here's an article about the findings from the New York Times.

Ironically, my dad had both heart disease and suffered a severe stroke. He also had Alzheimer's.

He drank nothing but diet sodas, and tea and coffee sweetened artificially for the last 10-15 years of his life because he was diabetic.

Takeaway Truth

Always keep abreast of the latest scientific research regarding health and nutrition. Alter your diet accordingly.

4 comments:

  1. I'm not surprised by this. I gave up soda years ago. Thanks for the information.

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  2. Low-calorie sweeteners have been proven safe by worldwide government safety authorities as well as hundreds of scientific studies and there is nothing in this research that counters this well-established fact. The FDA, World Health Organization, European Food Safety Authority and others have extensively reviewed low-calorie sweeteners and have all reached the same conclusion - they are safe for consumption.

    Moreover, the authors of this study acknowledge that their conclusions do not - and cannot - prove cause and effect with respect to stroke and dementia. And according to the National Institutes of Health (NIH), many risk factors can increase an individual's likelihood of developing stroke and dementia including age, hypertension, diabetes and genetics. NIH does not mention zero calorie sweeteners as a risk factor.

    It's also important to note that scientific evidence establishes that beverages containing these sweeteners can be a useful tool as part of an overall weight management plan. In fact, the CHOICE study, published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition in January of 2013 confirms that low- and no-calorie beverages can be an important tool in helping reduce calories.

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    Replies
    1. Thank you for your comment. Because of the content of your remarks, I'm wondering if you are with the food industry or associated with any of the organizations you cite or with diet clinics or programs.

      There are many food products, drugs, and treatments that were once deemed safe, but, after more information and research, they were removed or had strict warnings placed upon them.

      Yes, there are many risk factors that increase someone's risk of developing stroke and dementia, BUT, this latest research has not been disproved.

      If a person were concerned about developing stroke and dementia, then why shouldn't they remove diet sodas from their diet?

      You said, "In fact, the CHOICE study, published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition in January of 2013 confirms that low- and no-calorie beverages can be an important tool in helping reduce calories."

      I do not disagree with that statement. Yes, diet sodas may reduce the DAILY CALORIE INTAKE BUT--and this is important to note--it does NOT help an individual to lose weight.

      Reducing daily calorie intake and losing weight are 2 different things.

      There are several research studies that support the thesis that diet sodas cause weight gain.

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